New CHOICE testing of 10 trampolines has discovered which trampoline parents should keep an eye out for if they’re in the market for a new model.

“We tested 10 trampolines to the voluntary Australian standard and found that only one model, the Springfree R79, passed all of our safety tests,” says CHOICE testing expert, Chris Barnes.

“Our trampoline safety tests look at how children can use the product in real life as well as how the trampoline performs if you follow all safety instructions. We look at what can happen if children bounce against the enclosure net or land hard on the padding.”

“Based on our safety testing, CHOICE has found that the Springfree R79 is the best model on the market because of its strong, durable frame and enclosure, and the way in which the trampoline protects the user from any impacts against the frame, mat or enclosure. There are no significant entrapment hazards and the instructions are clear and easy to follow,”  says Barnes.

Another trampoline, the Jumpflex Flex100 passed the main structural tests, but had some minor safety failures.

“The remaining eight trampolines that we tested all had major safety failures, which included serious entrapment hazards, padding or enclosures that didn’t stand up to durability testing and structural failures,” says Barnes.

The trampoline models with major safety failures are:

  • Kahuna Classic 10ft
  • Kmart 12ft Springless
  • Lifespan HyperJump3
  • Little Nation 10ft Trampoline
  • OzTrampolines Summit
  • Plum Space Zone V3 30212
  • Premier Trampolines 10ft Premier with Net & Ladder
  • Vuly Thunder Medium

New CHOICE testing of 10 trampolines has discovered which trampoline parents should keep an eye out for if they’re in the market for a new model.

“Many safety risks can be minimised or avoided completely by safe use of the trampoline, such as only allowing one person on the trampoline at a time, or no deliberate bouncing against the net. We know that for a fun product like a trampoline, safety instructions aren’t always followed exactly by children. That’s why we test for foreseeable misuse and accidents, like bouncing against the enclosure net or landing hard on the padding,” says Barnes.

“If you have a trampoline in your backyard, there are a number of things you can do to make sure it’s being used safely. Supervise children when they’re using the trampoline, particularly if they’re under six years old. Only allow one child on the trampoline at a time, as accidents are much more likely to occur if there are multiple children on the trampoline at once. Tell your children not to bounce against the enclosures on purpose – stick to jumping in the middle of the trampoline instead,” says Barnes.

“Unfortunately, the current Australian standard for trampolines is only voluntary, which means manufacturers are not required by law to meet it,” says Barnes.

“If you have a trampoline in your backyard, there are a number of things you can do to make sure it’s being used safely.”

CHOICE Trampoline safety tips

Aside from buying a trampoline that meets the voluntary safety standard, parents and carers can take other precautions to minimise the risk of injury when using the trampoline.

Here are some suggestions for safe trampoline use:

  • Supervise children when they’re using the trampoline, particularly if they’re under six years old.
  • Only allow one person on the trampoline at a time.
  • Don’t deliberately bounce against the net.
  • Avoid landing hard on the padding.
  • Tell children to stick to bouncing in the middle of the trampoline.

“Many safety risks can be minimised or avoided completely by safe use of the trampoline, such as only allowing one person on the trampoline at a time, or no deliberate bouncing against the net,” explains Barnes.

“We know that for a fun product like a trampoline, safety instructions aren’t always followed exactly by children. That’s why we test for foreseeable misuse and accidents, like bouncing against the enclosure net or landing hard on the padding.”

Read the full CHOICE report here.